Long Live the Queen!

We have been in England for two weeks now and really love it! Arriving into England, after driving off the train, which took us under the English Channel from France, we found it really nice to see road signs that we understood! Although, there are still several words that got lost in translation… Several times we all looked at each other and said, huh what did he say? We are all speaking English but that doesn’t necessarily mean all things are understood! There are many books out there to help us Americans as we travel through beautiful England.

We are staying in a lovely cottage in the heart of Kent, owned by a wonderful couple. The cottage is a refurbished barn and the main home is approximately 700 years old. It is so green here and coming from Southern California, green is a very nice change. My sister and her really good friend Karen came to visit us. It was so great to see some familiar faces! We spoke with the owners of the cottage about getting a cot for them to sleep on. They asked if we needed a high chair too and we went, uh oh, I think we got off track somewhere. As we found out, a cot in England means a baby crib and no my sister is not a baby sister…so we opted for a blow up mattress instead. We are getting quite use to the language differences now and of course, love the accents. Once, we pulled over to ask for directions, and this sweet girl said she loved our accents, I have to say I have never heard that one before!

We have seen some amazing places. The richness of the history is so striking from Dover Castle, Leeds Castle, the City of Canterbury to the British Museum. The City of London itself is a museum, with its amazing buildings and tradition, and the Royal Family, I am in awe.

It is incredible to experience a country that has had so much history and importance. Dover Castle’s history spans over 2,000 years from the Old Roman Lighthouse to the World War II tunnels it was fascinating to see.

The English love their sports and we enjoyed visiting Wimbledon and watching a football match (soccer…) at Wembley Stadium, such a treat! We heard lots of “outstanding” and “brilliant” as the English football team easily defeated Italy’s San Marino team. We heard a lot of other words too that we’re not “lost in translation” but I am trying to keep this a family friendly blog.

We are here for another 10 days and are planning to see Windsor Castle, the Tower of London and will also be visiting the Harry Potter Studio Tour for my oldest daughter’s 11th birthday. What a life I am living, feeling very lucky!

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Down on the Bayeux, in Normandy

Okay, maybe not the same bayou but work with me…

Bayeux is a wonderful village in the Normandy region of France.  It is located 7km from the English Channel or La Manche, as the French call it.  Bayeux’s history dates back to the 1st century where is was a Gallo-Roman settlement. The city was largely destroyed during the Viking raids of the 9th century, but was rebuilt again in the 10th century.  Through the next several hundred years the city continued with its destruction and rebuilding as the English and French fought over control of the area.

Bayeux was the first city of the Battle of Normandy, during World War II, to be liberated.  On June 16, 1944,  General Charles de Gualle gave a speech in Bayeux, where he made it clear, that France sided with the allies. The buildings in Bayeux were virtually untouched during the Battle of Normandy, since the German forces were fully involved in defending Caen from the Allies.

Bayeux is popular now as visitors come to see the Bayeux Tapestry (it is actually embroidered cloth) which tells of the Norman Conquest of England in 1066 by William the Conqueror.  It is a site to be seen. The tapestry measures 70m (230ft) long.  You can listen to a recording as you stroll around the tapestry.  They also have recordings specifically for children (and in English).

The cathedral there is also a site to behold and was the original home of the Bayeux Tapestry.  The cathedral is known as the Cathedral of Notre-Dame de Bayeux and was consecrated on July 14, 1077.

Bayeux is a must stop on any Normandy visit.